Where’s the Map?

What is the plan for our ministry? Where are we going… and how are we getting there

Have you asked yourself these questions? I hope so!

Mark Dever once wrote,

It would be patently stupid to start construction on a building without first knowing what kind of building we plan to construct. An apartment complex is different from an office complex, which is different still from a restaurant. They all have different blueprints, different kinds of rooms, different materials, uses, and shapes… The same goes for building a church… It only makes sense, then, for us to revisit God’s Word to figure out what exactly He wants us to be building. Only then will we understand how to go about building it.

Today we are talking about three things that are absolutely necessary in any ministry, a theology, philosophy, and methodology of ministry. Obviously my direct application is in congregational worship… but it applies directly across the board for whatever ministry you are involved in. Having a theology, philosophy, and methodology for a ministry has been compared by some to having blueprints for the construction of a building, just as it would be a disaster to work on a building without a carefully thought out plan, it would be disastrous to a ministry to not have a philosophy of ministry.

A church’s theology explains what the church believes, a church’s philosophy explains the practical ramifications and outworking of those beliefs, and their methodology provides the roadmap for how the church is going to get there. Invariably, these things will inform and affect each other in this sense, a church’s philosophy of ministry is also her theology of ministry. What the church believes will ultimately determine how its ministry is carried out.

Now… we have to be careful and thoughtful when putting these things down on paper! Unfortunately the tendency is for us to make up our own philosophy of ministry, based on our own concept of what the church is supposed to do and what the church is supposed to be. The truth is, however, that God has clearly laid out for us in Scripture what the ministry of the church is!

The weight has been lifted off our shoulders!

We don’t have to decide why the church exists or what it’s purpose is… in the same way, we don’t have to determine what it is supposed to do. The mission is clear and laid out for us already! God has already established these things because the church is His institution on earth and not ours! We are just the custodians or caretakers. It is our responsibility, however, to determine how to most effectively and appropriately achieve our biblical mandate in our local context.


So… you may be saying, “Everything here is going fine. Why do I need to do these extra steps?” To that I want to offer you these practical benefits that flow from defining a biblical theology, philosophy, and methodology of ministry.

  • First, it forces you to be B Sometimes we treat our preferences in ministry as if they are Biblical and they just aren’t. Having a guide on paper helps us to cut through the fallen human aspect of ministry and keep our eyes on “the prize.”
  • Second, it just makes practical sense. You wouldn’t construct a building without a plan the same way that an army wouldn’t head off into battle without a strategy! Having a theology, philosophy, and methodology laid out helps us set actual goals that are consistent with our biblical
  • Third, it heightens our effectiveness, and improves our efficiency by preventing us from spending time on activities or beginning ministry efforts that are not part of the biblical mandate for the church. If we don’t have a road map we won’t know where we are going, and, consequently, we probably won’t get there.
  • Fourth, it helps us to be faithful to our call to ministry. Remember that call? Having a theology, philosophy, and methodology before us helps us to cut through the fog that comes with everyday ministry and pursue that particular call that the Lord put on our hearts at the beginning.
  • Fifth, and definitely not last, it motivates the church or ministry because they collectively know and are able to clearly see the direction in which they are heading. Nothing can be more frustrating for members than following a leader or leadership blindly.

So… we have talked about the benefits. Now, let’s lay out the plan. Below I have supplied an example by providing my theology, philosophy, and methodology for worship at the church in which I serve, New Hope Community Church. Take a look, copy and paste, and modify to fit your needs in ministry.


  • Theology

Theology of worship is simplistic in one nature but very involved and complex in another. The center of all Christian worship is Jesus Christ. It is Jesus Christ who fulfilled the Law and the Prophets, establishing a New Covenant with the Father through His death, burial, resurrection and ascension. It is because of the redeeming work of Jesus that we worship. Therefore our worship is to be formed by our relationship with God the Father through God the Son, as led by God the Holy Spirit. We are merely responding to His revealing. Our worship is an outpouring of our gratefulness to God our creator for the grace he has lavished upon us.

  • Philosophy/ Vision

My philosophy of worship is one that places values on things that exemplify Christ and His nature. If we are attempting to honor and glorify Christ in all that we do, including our public and congregational worship, then our worship needs to place the focus on none other than the Biblical attributes, characteristics, and principles of Christ. God-centeredness is of upmost importance and is the primary reasoning for all items listed and discussed below. Our services must be both vertical and horizontally oriented, and our worship should be both glorifying and edifying. We must draw near to Christ in our worship and in return He will draw near to us (James 4:8).

My philosophy of worship contains many values, the first being that our worship communicates the supremacy of God. Which in turn causes all worship to be shaped by and focused on God and encourages an expectancy and eagerness to encounter and engage with God in worship.

We should strive to provide and partake in worship that values and encompasses the Word of God, causing our worship to be reflective of the Word and reinforce Biblical teachings. Worship that places value in Biblical teaching through both proclamation and song will encourage believers to interact with Scripture and to make connections while applying it to their own lives and personal worship. I believe that often we overlook the foundational impact that our music plays in the lives of our congregations. We are forming their beliefs about God and the Gospel on a weekly basis through what we sing. The things we proclaim through song are taken out of the church within the hearts and minds of the people every week.

Worship should value both traditional and modern worship styles. If we approach our worship in this manner it will in turn cause us to continually “seek out” a “new song” to sing unto the Lord (Psalm 96:1). The equal value placed in both traditional and modern worship keeps us from becoming complacent in our worship and/or all consumed with being the most cutting-edge in our worship.

My philosophy of worship also values heart, mind, and spirit. Worship should not be purely emotional in the same way that it should not be over thought or criticized. We should place importance in both heart and head in our worship. The head should inform the heart and inspire the mouth. Our worship should cause us to think, evaluate, contemplate the things and ways of God, but we cannot disconnect that aspect from our emotions and heart. We should also put emphasis on expressing ourselves and our emotions for Christ. A husband who speaks love to his wife and doesn’t show it would cause her to wonder, the same goes for us in our worship to Christ. This mindset causes us to approach worship in an open non-judgmental state and with an openness to worship however we feel led, although this isn’t meant to provide an open excuse for chaos or distraction. We are given Biblical instruction and example of worship, we are to seek to build up and unify the body of Christ not distract or tear down.

Our worship should value authenticity and inclusion. If we value both authenticity and inclusion then it should cause us to lay our own desires and preferences down at the foot of the cross and to lift up Christ alone. This also should encourage congregational singing in a “unifying” and “body-building” way. We aren’t worshipping merely for ourselves… we are worshipping for the edification of our Brothers and Sisters in Christ also.

Our worship isn’t limited to proclamation or song. Our worship should also value other artistic elements within it, whether it is sound, staging, lights, projection, drawn or written art, etc. We will strive to use our strengths to glorify while keeping the distraction of our weaknesses minimal. We will pursue un-distracting excellence in our worship and never go beyond our means or range of gifts or blessings. This should cause us to be diligent in honing our individual crafts, and well-rehearsed but open to the Spirit.

Lastly, our worship should value the work of the Spirit. We will plan and rehearse our services and programs prayerfully and with diligence but maintain openness for the Spirit to move, change, and lead. We must worship in a way that values Christ and the work of the Spirit more than our schedule.

  • Methodology

My methodology is one that was formed because of my theology and philosophy of worship. I believe that our reasoning for worshipping Christ is constant but many times the method can change freely. I believe that my method primarily includes, but is not limited to, the following discussed ideas:

I believe that we should be prayerfully planning and rehearsing our services. The Spirit isn’t limited to moving and leading only within a service, the Spirit can just as easily lead in the planning of a service or program. We must be prepared and rehearsed to the point where we can lead with excellence and without distraction. It also helps the musicians/ band/ choir to worship more freely in the service if they prepare adequately beforehand. Preparation isn’t limited to planning and practicing, but we should be prepared to worship spiritually ourselves. Every service should be approached with expectancy to see Christ move amongst our congregations. We should prepare spiritually before all.

I believe that an important aspect of our method of worship has to be creativity. As born-again-believers we should be even more creative than the secular world because we serve and know the ultimate mighty Creator. Replication of things that work or that are popular isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but we shouldn’t always resort to that. We should use our creativity to honor and glorify Christ the Creator.

Our worship should also provide opportunity to engage the congregation. We should provide the opportunities in our worship for people to dwell in the Spirit of the Lord and in order to do that effectively we must provide sing-able songs (in keys that are applicable to a wide variety of people) and we should attempt to remove and discourage distractions amongst our churches. We should teach biblical ways to worship and provide the opportunity to utilize those in our services.

We should be appreciative and balanced in our worship. Just because something is “old” doesn’t mean it is “out-dated” and just because something is “new” doesn’t mean that it is “groundbreaking” or superior. We should strive for quality of content overall and as far as sound or preference goes it’ll come along for itself. We must be plugged into the heart of our church and provide worship that is beneficial to the congregations needs instead of always going with our own preference.

In all things that we do we should approach with excellence. We serve a great God and He deserves great worship. In some cases that doesn’t mean sounding like a professional band, in some cases it does. We are to serve and worship with what God provides for us. We should be authentic, transparent, and excellent worshippers. Our striving from excellence shouldn’t distract from the purpose of excellence, but hopefully a balance can be found there as well.


In the end I believe that worship theology, philosophy, and methodologies should work together with the primary goal of providing excellent worship to God. Scripture provides examples, reasons, and instruction for worship but in the end it has to be personal and consistent. We serve a God who is faithful to us even when we aren’t always faithful to Him, that alone is worthy of more than we can give.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s